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Horse racing season to begin at deadly Hastings Racecourse

  • April 27th marks the beginning of live racing season at Hastings Racecourse in Vancouver.
  • Last year, eight horses lost their lives at Hastings.
  • Horses used in racing events endure stress, pain, and risk to their lives due to the high-pressure events, aversive training methods, and the use of painful tools like whips and bits.
  • Horses who no longer generate a profit are at risk of being sent to auction, where they face further trauma and can end up on a slaughterhouse floor.

Can you take the pledge to boycott inhumane horse racing events and add your name in support of protecting horses?

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2023 incidents

Take the pledge to say no to horse racing

By taking the pledge today, you will reflect your concern about recent race horse fatalities and incidents and to sign up to receive updates about the VHS’s upcoming horse racing campaign.

Learn more about the deaths of eight horses at Hastings Racecourse in 2023 here.

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Wins for animals in 2023

Happy new year! As we celebrate and prepare to build on last year’s momentum for animals in 2024, here is a look back on some of the incredible achievements that animal allies like you made possible last year. 

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Making life better for pets

Hundreds of pets received life-saving care

With rising costs of living and a rescue system struggling to meet the needs of animals, programs that keep loved animals in their homes are more essential than ever. Supporters from the community generously helped 580 animals to receive life-saving veterinary support through the VHS’s McVitie Fund.

Beloved companion animals like Arlo, who was diagnosed with a life-threatening liver condition called hepatic lipidosis, received the care they need and returned safely to their families thanks to donations from animal lovers like you.

Help pets in need

Helping People and Pets in Crisis helped families with pets find housing

The VHS’s Helping People and Pets in Crisis program helped 143 animals to access preventative care such as spays, neuters, and vaccines. These procedures enabled them and their 120 guardians to access stable housing where they could be safe and together.

Outreach helped pets in Vancouver’s vulnerable communities

At the VHS’s annual Because They Matter event, staff and volunteers met in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside community to share veterinary support resources, pet toys, leashes, harnesses, blankets, and more essential supplies with animals and their guardians who spend their days on the streets. The team handed out about 400 pamphlets and thousands of pet supplies over the course of the day!

The McVitie team also connected with pet guardians living on a low income at Pet Fair for People Care events by Community Veterinary Outreach.

Training helped organizations meet pet guardians where they are at

The VHS’s training program helped organizations across Canada meet animal guardians where they are at with trauma-informed, culturally safe care. The program welcomed 805 attendees through online courses, the team met nine organizations for face-to-face workshops, and live webinars reached 137 attendees!

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Speaking up for animals in entertainment

Saying no to horse racing

Last year, the VHS and supporters spoke out against the use of horses in dangerous racing events after a serious of fatal incidents at Hastings Racecourse. Concerns from the VHS were covered in 19 media outlets including Global News, City News Vancouver, The Aldergrove Star, and Victoria News. An opinion piece was published in the Daily Hive to raise awareness about the dangers posed to racehorses and to call on Vancouverites not to attend racing events.

The VHS also shared a pledge to say no to horse racing, which was signed by more than 860 people.

Standing up for animals used in the Calgary Stampede

VHS supporters rallied against rodeo cruelty in 2023! More than 15,000 people visited the RodeoTruth.com website, building on the momentum of last year’s awareness campaign. More than 1,800 people took the pledge to #SayNoToRodeo and the chuckwagon races at the Calgary Stampede.

2023 marked the 100th year of chuckwagon racing at the Calgary Stampede, which meant the races were featured prominently in media and event promotion. The VHS raised concerns about dangerous and inhumane races in the Daily Hive. Following a chuckwagon incident that resulted in yet another horse death, the VHS’s response was covered in outlets including Global News.

Opposing inhumane rodeo events in B.C.

In 2023, the Province of B.C. offered nearly $800,000 in taxpayer dollars to events that included rodeos. The VHS published two opinion pieces raising concerns about provincial funding for rodeos, “It’s time to stop using taxpayer money to fund inhumane events” and “Taxpayer money should NOT be funding rodeos in BC“.

The VHS also released concerning footage following the province’s rodeo season, which revealed stressed animals and rough handling. Some of this footage was featured in a VHS piece published in the Daily Hive entitled “A stressful and fear-filled glimpse into an animal’s first rodeo“.

Public opposition to rodeo is growing in B.C.—65% of residents are opposed to the practice, and advocates continue to hold protests at controversial rodeo events.

Take action on rodeo

A win for animals in Port Moody!

More than 8,000 advocates signed the VHS’s actions calling for an end to provincial funding of rodeos and for municipal bans on inhumane rodeo events.

The City of Port Moody responded to the public demand for change, with City Council unanimously voting for a bylaw prohibiting events including bucking, roping, wrestling, and mutton busting!

Port Moody joins the City of Vancouver and District of North Vancouver in introducing rodeo bylaws to protect animals.

Protecting farmed animals

Calling for transparency for farmed animals

A number of undercover investigations last year found horrific suffering on farms and in slaughterhouses in B.C. Advocates took strong action speaking out against this treatment of animals, with more than 8,500 supporters demanding that the B.C. government introduce greater protections including video surveillance, unannouced inspections, and meaningful penalties for industry stakeholders found guilty of cruelty.

Another 4,000 allies used the VHS’s quick action tool to oppose Bill C-275, a federal “ag-gag” bill which would criminalize whistleblowers and undercover investigators who expose animal cruelty or welfare issues on farms. You can read more about concerns with this bill in a joint piece written by the VHS and Animal Justice, “New bill would silence those who shed light on animal cruelty“.

New Dairy Code of Practice released

In 2022, the VHS and other animal organizations across Canada spoke out for animals during a consultation period on the National Farm Animal Care Council’s (NFACC) Dairy Cattle Code of Practice, which provides guidelines for the care of dairy cows on farms across Canada, and shared tips on how to call for much-needed improvements during the public comment period. 

Thousands of animal advocates and concerned consumers responded, and the Code received a record-setting 5,800+ comments! The strong public response during the public consultation prompted some positive changes to the new Code released in 2023, including stronger restrictions around abusive handling, changes to housing models, and a ban on branding. However, the VHS continues to draw attention to several areas of the Code which still fall short of expectations through messages like an opinion piece published in The Province.

Working to end live horse exports for slaughter

The VHS team was hard at work raising awareness and opposition of the cruel live horse export industry. The VHS Partnered with Canadian Horse Defence Coalition (CHDC) President Sinikka Crosland to release an episode of The Informed Animal Ally, submitted a letter with animal organizations nationwide that led to a meeting with government officials, and shared a quick action supported by more than 6,714 supporters!

Thanks to the efforts of advocates across the country, 2 bills have been introduced to ban the industry!

Photo: Canadian Horse Defence Coalition
Take action on horse exports

Giving Tuesday donors helped farmed animals today and in the future

On Giving Tuesday, the VHS partnered with The Happy Herd Farm Sanctuary to raise funds for vital animal supplies to care for rescued animals in a loving forever home, life-saving veterinary support, and advocacy to create meaningful changes for animals. Kind animal lovers supported animals through both organizations by donating or shopping at participating businesses, and donations were matched by generous sponsors including Panago Pizza, Vicky Reshetylo, Fraser Hall, and Spearhead Trucking Company.

Allies like you helped to raised a record-breaking $23,500 to help animals! This is enough funds:

  • …to cover food for all the cows of the Happy Herd for eight months
  • …AND for fourteen vet visits to the Happy Herd
  • …AND to cover food costs for all 22 goats at the Happy Herd for six months 
  • …AND for lifesaving tests for 35 pets in need through the VHS’s McVitie Fund
  • …AND to reach 156,922 animal allies to advocate for meaningful policy changes that will improve animal lives!

Plant-based advocacy protected animals by putting more plants on people’s plates

The VHS’s Plant University team was hard at work last year making plant-based eating more accessible and sharing information on how to make simple, compassionate changes.

The VHS released polling results that reveal plant-based eating is becoming more popular in the Lower Mainland. This poll also informed an impact report which outlined how one person can save money and reduce their environmental impact by transitioning to a plant-based diet. The report was covered in 23 media outlets including the Canadian Geographic and Kamloops Now, and the VHS was invited to speak about it at an event held at UBC Robson.

Plant University reached more people with information about plant-based eating! Messages about saving money and reducing land use and emissions were shared through radio ads, billboards, and bus ads. The team also developed a toolkit to help students learn about plant-based eating and shared a translated plant-based beginner’s guide to reach Punjabi speakers. This information reached more than two million people!

A kinder future for all species

Thank you for helping animals in 2023! Your support will help to create a kinder, more humane future for animals. Can you keep the momentum going by taking action on the current campaigns to end animal suffering or making a donation toward vital animal programs and advocacy?

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BC pig farm accused of cruelty—again

Photo: Animal Justice

Excelsior Hog Farm is in the news again after disturbing new undercover footage, allegedly filmed at the Abbotsford farm between April and June 2023, was released by Animal Justice.  

The footage shows:

  • cruel handling practices, including pigs being kicked in the stomach and face, and struck with metal rods and plastic boards;
  • injured pigs with hernias, pressure sores, open wounds and leg injuries; and
  • filthy conditions, including dead and rotting bodies of pigs and partially eaten bodies of piglets, and floors caked in feces and what appears to be blood and feces in some water troughs. 
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Watch the video (Warning: Graphic content)

Take action

Call for meaningful action to protect farmed animals, including: 

  • Government-mandated and proactively enforced farmed animal welfare regulations;  
  • Publicly available reports of independent, third-party audits on farms and in slaughterhouses, including consistent video surveillance monitoring for real transparency; and 
  • Appropriate deterrents to prevent animal cruelty, including unannounced inspections and effective penalties for industry stakeholders who are found guilty of animal cruelty. 

Fill out the form below to send this important message to your Member of B.C.’s Legislative Assembly (MLA), B.C.’s Premier, and B.C.’s Minister of Agriculture. Feel free to personalize the message.

Live outside of Canada? You can email B.C.’s Premier at premier@gov.bc.ca and the Minister of Agriculture at AF.Minister@gov.bc.ca

Not the first time Excelsior accused of cruelty

This comes after a previous undercover investigation at the farm in 2019, which also showed concerning on-farm conditions and treatment of pigs. The footage included clips of dead and dying pigs in unsanitary conditions and cruel handling, including piglets being castrated without the use of painkillers.

Despite this evidence, the farm’s owners were never charged or held accountable. Instead, two advocates involved in a peaceful protest and sit-in that took place on the farm, have been convicted and face jail time. Both are appealing their convictions. 

Second major undercover investigation in B.C. this year

While the animal agriculture industry attempts to suggest instances like this are the exception to the rule and don’t represent the industry as a whole, the reality is that numerous investigations over the years have revealed widespread animal cruelty and welfare issues on farms and in slaughterhouses.  

In February 2023, undercover footage from a Pitt Meadows-based slaughterhouse, Meadow Valley Meats, showed animals being hit, kicked and thrown to the ground; inhumane use of an electric prod; frightened animals crowding together in the hallways and panicked attempts to escape; and improper slaughter techniques that led to significant animal suffering.

Like Excelsior Hog Farm, this was not the first incident involving the company. Media reports that the company, formerly called Pitt Meadows Meats, pled guilty in 2015 to selling E. Coli-tainted meat and after the plant manager knowingly decided not to recall it.  

The new footage, along with the many other previous undercover investigations in B.C., make it clear that there are serious, systemic issues across the animal agriculture industry. 

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New footage captures inhumane handling and stressed animals at B.C. rodeos 

  • Newly released footage from several B.C. rodeos reveals recurring animal welfare issues, including animals being hit, kicked, and having their tail and ears twisted and pulled.  
  • New polling shows growing public opposition to the use of animals in rodeo events. 65% of B.C. residents and 67% of Canadians are opposed to the practice. 
  • Use the VHS’s quick action tool to share this new footage with your city council and B.C.’s Minister of Tourism and to call for a rodeo bylaw and an end to using taxpayer dollars to fund inhumane rodeo events.  
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Take quick action

Use the VHS’s quick action tool below to share this new footage and call for: 

  1. A municipal bylaw prohibiting inhumane rodeo events in your community; 
  2. An end to BC government funding of rodeo events. 

Watch the footage

Footage from the Princeton, Chilliwack, Armstrong and Merritt rodeos reveals recurring animal welfare issues. In the videos, stressed animals are roughly handled, deliberately agitated into fleeing and bucking, and put at risk of serious injury. Clips show animals being roped around the neck; thrown and wrestled to the ground; and kicked with spurs. Animals are seen being hit and kicked; having their tail and ears twisted and pulled. Frightened animals run into fences, thrash in the chutes, and resist handlers.

What happened at B.C. rodeos in 2023?

Newly released footage from several B.C. rodeos reveals recurring animal welfare issues, including animals being hit, kicked, and having their tail and ears twisted and pulled.

How rodeo handlers agitate animals into running & bucking

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Rodeos rely on prey animals’ “fight or flight” fear responses to make them “perform”.

Signs of stress in rodeo animals

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Animals experience fear, discomfort, and pain in rodeos. Watch for these signs of stress in rodeo footage, as seen in 2023 B.C.

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Another horse death & incident in B.C.’s horse racing industry 

The VHS continues to raise concerns about B.C.’s horse racing industry following this year’s eighth horse fatality at Hastings Racetrack and a separate incident that resulted in the injury of another horse.

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Media coverage

On October 14th, a two-year old horse named Skysablazing was euthanized following a complete open fracture to the left front leg sustained during a race at Hastings Racecourse. Skysablazing’s death marks the eighth horse fatality at Hastings this year. 

On October 19th, a two-year old horse named Wannabeabigstar stumbled and fell during a harness race at Surrey’s Fraser Downs Racetrack, resulting in a collision with another two-year old horse named Outlawstaythcourse. Wannabeabigstar sustained injuried to his knees and was receiving ongoing treatment as of October 31, when B.C.’s Gaming Policy and Enforcement Branch (GPEB) responded to the VHS’s inquiry about the condition of the horses. 

Following the spate of recent horse fatalities and incidents, along with the welfare issues associated with aversive training in the horse racing industry, the VHS is encouraging the public to pledge to not attend horse races.  

Incident details

See the most recent horse racing incident that took place at Surrey’s Fraser Downs racecourse. 

Previous race horse fatalities at Hastings Racecourse in 2023: 

  • On July 16, a five-year old horse named One Fifty One was euthanized after being injured during a race.  
  • On July 22, a three-year old horse named Lent Me Twenty died after falling backward and hitting her head prior to a race. 
  • On July 30, a four-year old horse named Memorandum was euthanized after sustaining a traumatic injury during a race.  
  • On August 6, a five-year old horse named Eddie Who died after falling during a workout. 
  • On August 22, a five-year old horse named Indy Go Gold was euthanized after sustaining a catastrophic injury of his right hind leg during a timed workout.  
  • On August 7, a four-year old horse named Lil Miss Intaglio was euthanized after presenting with symptoms of colic (gastrointestinal distress) on September 5. Despite treatment, her condition worsened and she was subsequently euthanized. 
  • On September 16, a two-year old horse named Shadesofriogrande died after escaping the stable area at the racecourse and running into a wall. 

Media coverage

You can read and watch more about this year’s incidents and responses from the public and the Vancouver Humane Society in the following news outlets:

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TAKE ACTION: Support two new bills to ban Canada’s export of live horses for slaughter 

Speak up for horses: Support two new federal bills calling for a ban on the cruel live horse export industry!

Action: Send a message to federal decision-makers

Use the email template below to send a personalized message to your Member of Parliament, the federal Minister of Agriculture and the Prime Minister, asking them to act to end the export of live horses for slaughter.

Note: If you live outside of Canada and want to take action, you can email the Prime Minister at: PM@pm.gc.ca and the Minister of Agriculture at: aafc.minister-ministre.aac@agr.gc.ca

Two new bills aim to protect horses

Two new bills aim to ban the controversial practice of exporting live horses from Canada for slaughter abroad. Senate Bill S-270, the Horse Protection Act, was introduced by Senator Pierre Dalphond and singer-songwriter Jann Arden, while private member’s bill C-355 was introduced in the House of Commons by Liberal MP Tim Louis. 

These bills come more than a year and a half after the Prime Minister directed the federal Minister of Agriculture to ban the practice. Yet since then, thousands of live draft horses have been loaded onto planes, packed tightly with 3-4 horses per crate, and flown abroad where they will be slaughtered for meat. 

These two new bills present a crucial opportunity for the federal government to follow through on their promise to ban live horse export for slaughter once and for all. Use the quick action tool below to urge decision-makers to prioritize a ban before the next federal election.  

Photo: Canadian Horse Defence Coalition

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UPDATE: ‘Ag-gag’ bill reaches review stage. Take Action!

Update

This action has now ended. Thank you to the 4,020 advocates who used the quick action to speak out against anti-transparency ag-gag bills. Please see the Current Campaigns page for more ways you can help protect farmed animals.

  • Bill C-275 has been sent to the House of Commons agriculture committee for further review this fall.
  • This federal ‘ag-gag’ bill would criminalize whistleblowers and undercover investigators who expose animal cruelty or welfare issues on farms.
  • Tell decision-makers to vote NO to C-275.

An ‘ag-gag’ bill that targets animal advocates and whistleblowers will soon go to a vote. Tell your Member of Parliament to say NO to Bill C-275.

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Quick action: Tell decision-makers to vote NO to C-275.

This action has now ended.

4,020 people used the quick action tool to oppose Bill C-275. Thank you for taking action.

See more campaigns

Why say no to Bill C-275?

While decision-makers claim Bill C-275 aims to protect on-farm biosecurity by deterring trespassers, trespassing laws already exist and the government’s own data indicates that previous disease outbreaks have been caused by poor on-farm practices from owners/operators. The standard industry practice of keeping large numbers of genetically similar animals in close confinement creates a prime environment for disease outbreak.

Similar ‘ag-gag’ bills have been implemented in other jurisdictions to further limit transparency of the animal agriculture industry and prevent undercover exposes that shed a negative light on this hidden industry.

Instead of targeting whistleblowers who expose the conditions and treatment of animals on farms, the government should be addressing the conditions and treatment directly. Following a disturbing recent undercover expose of a B.C.-based slaughterhouse, the VHS is reiterating the urgent need for more transparency and accountability within the animal agriculture sector, not less.

Join this call to action by urging federal decision-makers, including your Member of Parliament, the House of Commons Agriculture Committee, and the federal Minister of Agriculture, to say NO to Bill C-275.

Ask your MP to say NO to Bill C-275
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New footage reveals animal suffering at Chilliwack Rodeo 

  • The Vancouver Humane Society (VHS) is again raising concerns of animal suffering at the annual Chilliwack Rodeo.
  • Footage from this year’s Chilliwack Rodeo shows animals being subjected to fear, discomfort and stress for sake of public entertainment.
  • This new footage, along with similar concerning footage from last year’s Chilliwack rodeo, reinforces that animal suffering is inherent to many rodeo events, including roping, bucking, wrestling and mutton busting (kids riding sheep).
  • The VHS is asking residents and tourists to call on Chilliwack City Council to pass a bylaw to prohibit inhumane rodeo events.
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Animals suffer at Chilliwack rodeo

Footage from the recent Chilliwack rodeo shows stressed and agitated animals being roughly handled, thrashing around in the chutes, and being put at risk of injury and death. Obvious signs of stress are seen throughout the footage, including excessive salivation, defecation and resisting handlers.

The VHS also documented similar animal welfare issues during last year’s Chilliwack rodeo, reinforcing the reality that many rodeo events rely on the use of fear, discomfort and stress through rough handling and the use of aversive tools (e.g. flank straps and spurs) to make animals flee and buck in response.

Watch the footage:

Animal welfare issues at the 2023 Chilliwack Rodeo

Footage from the recent Chilliwack rodeo shows stressed and agitated animals being roughly handled, thrashing around in the chutes, and being put at risk of injury and death. Obvious signs of stress are seen throughout the footage, including excessive salivation, defecation and resisting handlers.

Calling for removal of inhumane rodeo events

The VHS continues to urge Chilliwack Fair organizers and local decision-makers to remove inhumane rodeo events, including roping, wrestling, bucking and mutton busting from the fair’s program.

Take the steps below to support this call to action in Chilliwack and beyond.

1) Send a message to Chilliwack City Council

Send an email or follow-up email to Chilliwack City Council, calling for an end to inhumane rodeo events at the Chilliwack Fair. Respectfully share your concerns as a tourist or resident about the treatment of animals and the footage from this year’s rodeo.

Email Chilliwack City Council

In your own words, consider highlighting the following key points: 

  • There are ongoing issues with the treatment of animals at the Chilliwack Rodeo. Footage from this year’s rodeo again shows animals being roughly handled during events, agitated in the chutes beforehand, and ultimately being put at unnecessary risk of injury and death for the purpose of public entertainment.
  • Signs of fear and stress are evident, including excessive drooling, defecation and resisting handlers.
  • I am urging Chilliwack city council to take action to end inhumane rodeo events in Chilliwack. There are many other activities at the fair that can be enjoyed without putting animals at risk. Please work with fair organizers to remove inhumane rodeo events from the fair’s program and follow the lead of other municipalities by enacting a bylaw to prohibit such events in the community.

2) Call for a bylaw prohibiting inhumane rodeo events in your community

Use the VHS’s quick action tool to call for a bylaw prohibiting inhumane rodeo events in your community.  

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Call for an end to inhumane events at Chilliwack Rodeo 

This weekend’s Chilliwack Fair will feature controversial rodeo events including roping, wrestling, bucking and mutton busting (children riding sheep). 

Last year, the VHS documented numerous animal welfare issues during the Chilliwack Rodeo, including animals being roughly handled; stressed animals thrashing in the chutes in attempts to escape; and animals being put at risk of injury for the sake of public entertainment.  

Take action
Watch the video

Two actions to help animals used in cruel rodeo events

1) Send a message to Chilliwack City Council

Email Chilliwack decision-makers calling for an end to inhumane rodeo events at the Chilliwack Fair. Respectfully share your concerns as a tourist or Chilliwack resident about the treatment of animals in rodeo events and that you’d like to see the Fair continue without the rodeo.

Email Chilliwack City Council

In your own words, consider highlighting the following key points: 

  • Public polling shows a majority of British Columbians oppose the use of animals in rodeo. 
  • The handling and treatment of animals during rodeo events puts them at unnecessary risk of injury and death.  
  • Signs of stress and fear are clearly visible in photos and videos of animals during rodeo events. 
  • There are no shortage of other events and activities that can bring the community together at the Chilliwack Fair without putting animals in harm’s way.
  • It’s time for the Chilliwack Fair to drop inhumane rodeo events including roping, wrestling, bucking and mutton busting. 

2) Call for a bylaw prohibiting inhumane rodeo events in your community

Use the VHS’s quick action tool to call for a bylaw prohibiting inhumane rodeo events in your community.  

What happened at last year’s Chilliwack Rodeo?

What happened at Chilliwack Rodeo 2022?

Last year, the Vancouver Humane Society documented numerous animal welfare issues during the Chilliwack Rodeo, including animals being roughly handled; stressed animals thrashing in the chutes in attempts to escape; and animals being put at risk of injury for the sake of public entertainment.

Back to take action
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Union of BC Indian Chiefs rejects factory farming, calls for change

On July 20, 2023, the Union of BC Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) issued an open letter to both the provincial and federal Minister’s of Agriculture calling for government action to address the animal welfare, climate and environmental impacts of factory farming.  

The open letter cites UBCIC Resolution 2023-19 “Call to Strengthen Animal Farming Practices and Address the Significant Environmental Impacts of Factory Farming”, which was unanimously endorsed at the UBCIC Chiefs Council in June. 

Read the UBCIC resolution
Learn more about factory farming

The Resolution highlights “our spiritual and ethical responsibility to treat our animal relations with respect, reciprocity, and dignity” and that “poor treatment of animals in factory farming practices contravenes the customs, laws, traditions and values of First Nations in BC who maintain deep spiritual connections to all living things, including new animal kin that were brought over by colonization and European settlement.” 

It goes on to note that: 

“Animals on factory farms are one of the most unregulated and unprotected groups of animals in BC and Canada, and their mistreatment during raising, transport and unethical slaughtering practices is a punishable act under the Criminal Code, but the lack of regulation and oversight bodies prevents it from occurring.”

The Resolution also highlights the intersection between factory farming, climate change, habitat and biodiversity loss “that have resulted in the displacement of Indigenous peoples and our animal kin to make room for mass and over-producing factory farms…” 

The UBCIC Chiefs Council issues a powerful call to action for the B.C. and federal governments, urging both to “work with First Nations to co-develop legislation and regulations in alignment with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that reduce the impacts of climate change and habitat loss due to factory farming, and reduce the risk of disease and suffering of animals on factory farms, and that provide funding to communities in order to support the transition to better animal welfare practices more aligned with a cruelty-free stance toward animals.” 

Read the UBCIC resolution
Learn more about factory farming