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News/Blog

New report highlights benefits of shifting municipal food purchasing toward more plant-based options

VHS recently launched a new report, “Increasing Plant-Based Purchasing at the Municipal Level”, which examines food purchasing for the City of Vancouver. The report reviews the impact of a shift in municipal food purchasing that reduces the volume of animal-based foods by 20%, to be replaced with plant-based alternatives.

It concludes that by replacing 20% of animal-based food products with plant-based alternatives, the City of Vancouver could expect to:

  • save up to $99,000
  • reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 500 tonnes
  • save the equivalent of nearly 400 farmed animal lives on annual basis

VHS is distributing this report amongst municipal decision-makers at the City of Vancouver and will be highlighting opportunities for its implementation.

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News/Blog

Take action for animals at the New Westminster Petting Farm

Take action for animals at the Queen’s Park Petting Farm

Tell the City of New Westminster you support their move toward animal-friendly public spaces

Will you support animal-friendly public spaces in New Westminster?

Earlier this year, VHS wrote to New Westminster City Council regarding the Queen’s Park Petting Farm. We shared a briefing note highlighting our evidence-based concerns related to animal welfare, public health and safety, and public education. The note included considerations such as:

  • Petting zoos are stressful for animals, who have little or no way to escape from unwanted petting, chasing, noise, and crowds.
  • Studies show that petting zoos can host diseases such as E. coli and Salmonella and can be a breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
  • Most children who visit petting zoos do not gain any new knowledge about animals or conservation. (See these animal-friendly alternatives for more educational family activities.)
  • The smell of animals in petting zoos can attract coyotes.

We recommended that municipal decision-makers close the petting farm and are pleased to see City Council moving in this direction. The City of New Westminster recently launched a public consultation seeking feedback and ideas from residents for an alternative long-term future for the space at Queen’s Park.

Take action:

1. Residents of New Westminster can participate in the online forum now!

We’re encouraging New Westminster residents to participate in the consultation and show their support for closing the petting farm and shifting the space to be focused instead on local, sustainable food production. This is a prime opportunity to improve public access to humane, healthy, and sustainable plant-based food. Share your excitement and ideas with municipal decision-makers!

Some ideas that have been suggested in the consultation are:

  • A community garden with plant-based food preparation lessons
  • A space for seasonal classes such as preparing balcony produce planters
  • A pollination garden

For more background information and VHS’s recommendations to City Council, read our briefing note on the Queen’s Park Petting Farm.

2. Know someone in New Westminster?

Share this page with your animal-friendly friends and family using the buttons below.

3. Share the tweets below.

Thank you @New_Westminster for taking action to create animal-friendly alternatives to the Queen’s Park Petting Farm.
Vancouver Humane Society
Tweet
The move by @New_Westminster to reimagine the Queen’s Park Petting Farm space is great news for animal welfare, public health and safety, and family education.
Vancouver Humane Society
Tweet
Petting farms are stressful for animals and can be a health hazard for humans. I support the move by @New_Westminster toward a more animal-friendly and family-friendly public space in Queen’s Park.
Vancouver Humane Society
Tweet

Read the briefing note:

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News/Blog

5 activities to help children love animals

Looking for animal-friendly activities for kids? Try these 5 activities to help your children develop a love of animals!

There is something special about the bond between children and animals.

Children are fascinated by animals; they are able to connect with them on an emotional level and empathize with their perspective. Having empathy for animals helps children to grow in a number of ways. Children who learn to respect animals also:

  • develop a respect for other lives
  • learn to read nonverbal cues
  • develop lifelong compassion

But how can parents and caregivers help children foster a love of animals?

This question has come up recently in the Lower Mainland, where the City of New Westminster launched a public consultation seeking feedback and ideas from residents for alternatives to the Queen’s Park petting farm. This is a great move toward more animal-friendly public spaces; you can read more about why replacing the petting farm is a win for animal welfare and public health and safety in our latest blog post.

Luckily, there are many ways for children to develop empathy for animals outside of petting farms. Keep reading for more ideas!

1. Go for a wildlife walk

Two young children looking out at seagulls on the ocean.

New Westminster and the rest of the Lower Mainland are filled with beautiful walking trails! You can also spot many species of urban wildlife like squirrels and pigeons around the city. Try visiting a local trail or park to look for birds, squirrels, frogs, and other small wildlife.

Seeing wild animals can give children the same sense of wonder as seeing captive ones—without causing animal suffering. Bonus: this activity has an added educational element! Viewing wildlife from a distance helps children to understand that humans share our environment with many animals who should be given space and respect.

2. Watch a wildlife webcam

Rubbing Beach – Underwater powered by EXPLORE.org

See for yourself what it looks like when the orcas in British Columbia’s Johnstone Strait take part in the unique behavior called “beach rubbing.” Watch live…

Looking to learn about other ecosystems and animals a little farther from home? There are many webcams set up around the world to observe wildlife in their natural habitats, like this daily live safari or these orca cameras right here in B.C.

Talk about what the animals are doing, such as looking for food to eat or caring for their babies. Caregivers can also introduce children to the concept of conservation by explaining that it’s important to have spaces in nature where animals can live free.

3. Visit a farm sanctuary

A happy toddler pets a calf at a farm sanctuary

If you’re able to travel a little farther, consider visiting a farm sanctuary or even volunteering! Farm sanctuaries value compassion for all living beings, so children can learn about having empathy for animals and creating a kinder world. You can find a map of farm sanctuaries near you from P.E.A.C.E.

If you don’t have the chance to take a day trip, you can still learn all about farm sanctuaries and meet some of the animals with this informative video from The Happy Herd.

4. Interact with companion animals

A girl lies on the floor with a dog

Having companion animals at home is a great way for children to learn to care for another life. However, not everyone can have animals in their home. If you are able to, consider visiting or meeting up with a friend and their companion animal so your child can meet and interact with them. Families with older children can also check whether their local animal shelter has youth volunteer opportunities.

Interacting with companion animals can help children to learn social skills like nonverbal cues. For instance, teaching a child that a dog wants to be patted when she is nuzzling, sniffing them, and wagging her tail; or that she wants her own space when she begins to walk away.

5. Read stories with animal characters

Storytime with Esther T.W. Pig: The True Adventures of Esther the Wonder Pig

Relax, sit down, and have a listen to “The True Adventures of Esther the Wonder Pig”. You can also check out a digital copy of the book, FREE of charge, on o…

Children do not need to touch or even see animals to love them—just ask any kid who is obsessed with dinosaurs! Books do a great job of helping children empathize with characters they would not necessarily meet in their day to day life, including animals. Here are some of our favourite children’s books with animal characters:

  • The True Adventures of Esther the Wonder Pig (recommended for ages 4-8 years)
  • Charlotte’s Web (recommended for ages 7-10 years)
  • Black Beauty (recommended for ages 8-12 years)

After you read with your child, you can help them understand even more about the animal in the story by looking up child-friendly facts about that species.

Looking for more animal-friendly activities for kids?

Find more resources to help children learn about animals on the Vancouver Humane Society website.

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Opinion Editorial

It’s an inconvenient truth that fish are sentient and feel pain

Article originally published in The Georgia Straight.

Ready for another inconvenient truth?  Here’s one: fish feel pain, are sentient, and are far more intelligent than we thought.

Even more inconvenient—we need to do something about it.

The scientific evidence that fish are sentient (able to feel and perceive things) has been piling up over the past few decades, but this information, much less its implications, has yet to permeate public consciousness.

When people think of fish, it’s usually as food, sport, or something to look at in an aquarium. Are we ready to accept that fish have feelings?

There is now a scientific consensus that fish feel pain. Research has shown that, like mammals, they have pain receptors (nociceptors) that detect injury. And, although their nervous systems and brains are different from ours, they are capable of experiencing pain. Studies have found that fish change their behaviour when subjected to a painful event and that painkillers prevent that behaviour, indicating that they are suffering, not just physically reacting to a negative stimulus.

In her groundbreaking 2010 book Do Fish Feel Pain?, biologist Victoria Braithwaite summed up her view on the issue: “I have argued that there is as much evidence that fish feel pain and suffer as there is for birds and mammals—and more than there is for human neonates and preterm babies.”

But fish can feel more than pain. Research has shown they can experience feardepression, and pleasure. The case for fish sentience has been eloquently made by Jonathan Balcombe in his book What a Fish Knows, which he says he was inspired to write “when I became aware of fascinating scientific discoveries about fishes that revealed rich, complex lives, and I realized how very little of this information was reaching the public consciousness”.

Many scientists now subscribe to such views. Culum Brown, a biologist at MacQuarie University in Australia who has studied fish cognition and behaviour for 25 years, has said, “You should think about fish in the same way you think about a pig or a cow.”

Evidence for fish intelligence is also well established. One remarkable example is the cognitive ability of the frillfin goby, a small fish frequently trapped in rock pools when the tide goes out. Often, the gobies jump from pool to pool, but how do they know where the next pool is and how far to jump? Scientists have researched this question for a number of years, concluding that the gobies are able to make a mental map of the positions of the pools so they know exactly where to jump. So much for the myth that fish have a three-second memory.

Studies have found that fish use toolsrecognize other fish, and can recognize themselves in a mirror (an ability previously thought to be confined to humans and a few other animals such as primates and dolphins.)

Our image of fish as dead-eyed, silent, scaly creatures makes it hard to regard them as intelligent beings with feelings, but the science cannot be ignored. We need to change the way we think about fish.

That means thinking about fish welfare. We give many other animals—dogs, cats, farm animals, terrestrial wildlife—at least some measure of welfare protection under the law or through regulation. Fish get almost none.

Improving their welfare is challenging, but there are steps that consumers, government, and industry can take.

As vegetarians and vegans will argue, the best step is to stop eating fish and switch to a plant-based diet. It’s an ethical choice that would also reduce the consumption that has led to 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks being fully exploited, overexploited, or depleted.

For those who do eat fish, there are few humane choices. Hooks hurt. Fish suffocate when they are hauled out of the water. Some pioneering fishers have invested in technology to stun fish within seconds of being brought aboard, but such methods are rare in the fishing industry.

Fish farms are notorious for poor fish welfare and environmental problems, but the development of Canada’s first code of practice for farmed salmonids is a sign that fish welfare is starting to be taken seriously.

Such developments may take years to have a significant impact on fish welfare. They need support and investment from government and industry.

In the meantime, it’s best to leave fish off your plate.

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News/Blog

Speak out to end the inhumane live export of horses

Please support the call to the federal government to ban the live export of horses for human consumption.

This inhumane trade involves draft horses, known as “gentle giants”, being shipped live in wooden crates to Japan and for slaughter for human consumption. Since 2014, more than 27,000 draft horses have been live exported by air, primarily to Japan, for slaughter.

VHS has signed a joint letter to the federal Minister of Agriculture, calling for the Canadian government to stop the inhumane shipments of draft horses to other countries for slaughter.

You can help by signing the House of Commons E-petition, which calls for an end to “air shipments of horses exported for human consumption, due to ongoing animal welfare concerns inherent in this practice.”

Categories
Opinion Editorial

Farming and grocery industries’ broken promises betray majority of Canadians

Article originally published in The Georgia Straight.

For decades, animal-welfare groups have been campaigning for better conditions for animals on Canada’s farms. Progress has been slow, but two major achievements seemed to be within reach: an end to battery cages for laying hens and a phase-out of gestation crates for pigs. Until now. 

Hopes for better lives for pigs and hens are now in doubt following news that the Retail Council of Canada (RCC) is reneging on commitments to sourcing only cage-free eggs and to shift away from selling pork from farms using gestation crates. The RCC represents Canada’s major grocery chains. 

Last week, the RCC announced that it “will pursue and make commitments solely through NFACC, thus removing previous commitments on sow housing and cage-free eggs…”. NFACC is the National Farm Animal Care Council, an industry-dominated body that oversees codes of practice for the care and handling of farm animals. 

In 2013, the RCC announced it would move toward sourcing pork from pigs raised in “alternative housing practices” by 2022. In 2016, the council committed to sourcing only eggs from cage-free hens by 2025.  

The RCC’s abandonment of these commitments follows last year’s decision by Canada’s pig farmers to renege on their 2014 commitment to end the continuous use of gestation stalls by 2024. 

These moves by farmers and the grocery industry fly in the face of public opinion. Polling has shown that 85 percent of Canadians support a complete phase-out of gestation stalls, and almost two-thirds want an end to battery cages for hens. 

Gestation crates confine pregnant sows so tightly that they are unable to engage in natural behaviours or even turn around. Scientists and animal welfare experts have long argued that the crates compromise pigs’ welfare. Temple Grandin, the renowned professor of animal science, has stated: “Gestation crates for pigs are a real problem… Basically, you’re asking a sow to live in an airline seat…” 

Battery cages for laying hens allow approximately 22 x 22 cm (9 x 9 inches) of space per hen, preventing them from engaging in natural behaviours or even flapping a wing.  The European Union banned battery cages in 2012. 

There is no doubt that gestation crates and battery cages are inhumane and that consumers want them gone. So why are the farming and grocery industries backsliding on their promises to move toward systems with better animal welfare?  Are they hoping the commitments they made amidst high-profile campaigns by animal-welfare groups can be quietly dropped now that those campaigns have abated? 

If so, they are misreading the public mood, which has been increasingly supportive of better welfare for farm animals. A 2017 poll found that a majority of Canadians would pay grocers more if animal welfare were improved. 

Breaking promises to support better welfare could backfire on farmers and the RCC, as animal-welfare organizations and the public lose faith in a system that is essentially self-regulating and dependent on the industry-dominated NFACC. The public perception that animal agriculture is averse to transparency and accountability has already been heightened by the introduction of “Ag-gag” legislation in Ontario and Alberta. Calls for independent regulation, inspection, and enforcement are likely to grow as trust in industrialized animal agriculture and the grocers that sell its products declines. 

Canadians know animals suffer on factory farms and they want it to stop. (Is it any wonder that the plant-based food industry is booming?) If farmers and retailers break their promises on gestation crates and battery cages, hundreds of thousands of pigs and millions of laying hens will suffer. The RCC needs to stand by its previous commitments on farm-animal welfare, not only to show it cares about what consumers want but because it’s the ethical thing to do.

Categories
Opinion Editorial

Warm yourself up with these ethical alternatives to down

Article originally published on Daily Hive.

As the Canadian winter drags on and the country is gripped in a polar vortex, many of us will be looking for clothes and bedding to stay warm, whether it’s tucked up in bed or snow-shoeing up a mountain.

But how many shoppers will be aware that their choice of purchase may add to the misery of ducks and geese who are forced to supply a key component of the products we commonly use to keep us warm?

Down, that soft layer of feathers closest to a duck’s or goose’s skin is highly-prized in the textile industry as a thermo-insulator. Hence, its use in outdoor clothing, duvets, quilts and pillows. But the comfort down provides for humans stands in stark contrast to the treatment of ducks and geese who supply it.

Down is collected in three ways: Live-plucking; post-slaughter plucking and “gathering.”

Of these, live-plucking is considered the most unethical and inhumane practice, as it involves the painful stripping of feathers, often ripping the skin.

The amount of live-plucking in the down industry is disputed. The industry contends that it is rare and that most down is obtained from ducks and geese that have been slaughtered for food.

However, a 2009 Swedish investigative documentary estimated that between 50 and 80 % of down is sourced through live-plucking – a figure later confirmed by retail giant IKEA.

China, which has no national animal welfare laws, produces about 80% of the world’s down. Live-plucking is condemned by the China Feather and Down Industrial Association and the European Down and Feather Association but cases of live-plucking have been reported in China, Hungary and Poland.

In 2016, several farms practicing live-plucking in China were exposed by the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). 

Down obtained post-slaughter has its own ethical issues. Ducks and geese raised for food are factory farmed around the world, with inhumane conditions being exposed in a number of countries from Taiwan to Australia to the United Kingdom.

In Canada, PETA exposed the mistreatment of geese at a Manitoba farm in 2017. 

Down collected through “gathering” or “harvesting” is the removal of loose feathers from a live duck or goose during moulting, when the birds naturally lose their feathers. 

However, research has shown they can still suffer as a result of poor handling and because not all birds will be moulting at the same time. 

Animal welfare controversies over down have led to the emergence of the Responsible Down Standard but certified farms have been exposed for animal abuse. Some companies, such as Patagonia, use the Global Traceable Down Standard. Four Paws, an international animal welfare group, has developed a ranking system to identify companies with the highest standards. Despite these initiatives, doubts linger about the transparency of the industry.

The best way to avoid the animal welfare pitfalls of down is to buy products using alternative materials for thermo-insulation. There are several, including PlumtechPolartecPrimaLoft, and more

In Canada, non-down bedding can be purchased at Bed, Bath and Beyond or by shopping online at companies such as Wayfair.

Fashion retailers such as NoizeArc’teryxLolëSave the Duck and Frank & Oak carry down alternative outerwear and The North Face uses an alternative to down called Thermoball in some of its products. 

For sleeping bags, MEC and Atmosphere both carry high-quality, synthetic brands.

One concern about down alternatives is that many are petroleum-based, bringing into question their sustainability. The industry is seeking to address the issue, with some companies, such as Everlane, using recycled materials in their products.

One company, Pangaia, has developed a fully biodegradable material that can be used in coats, comforters and other products – made from wildflowers. 

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News/Blog

Speak up for animals on fur farms

Call for a ban on fur farming across Canada

Send a message to your B.C. MLA

Recent media reports of the spread of COVID-19 on B.C. mink farms has exposed the cruelty and danger inherent in the province’s fur farming industry.  Please send a message to your MLA to urge a ban on this unnecessary and inhumane industry.

Industrialized fur farms in B.C. confine thousands of mink in cramped conditions that deprive them of the opportunity to engage in natural behaviours.  Mink are semi-aquatic animals yet they are held in tiny wire cages without access to water for foraging. A cage for a single female mink measures only 8 inches (width) by 15 inches (height).

Mink spend their entire lives caged until they are killed in gas chambers filled with carbon monoxide. All this is for the sake of making products for the fashion and cosmetics industry.

Video footage of Canadian fur farms obtained by The Fur-Bearers has shown animals exhibiting self-mutilation, cannibalism and repetitive behaviours caused by the stress of confinement.

In addition to the fur industry’s cruelty, there is a threat to public health, as outbreaks of COVID-19 emerge on mink farms around the world.  Here in B.C., the virus has been found on two mink farms, with infections occurring in both animals and farm workers. Scientists fear that such outbreaks could lead to dangerous mutations of the virus. Escaped mink from farms are a potential threat to wild populations, increasing the chance of further virus mutation and spread.

Now is the time for the provincial and federal governments to end the cruel and dangerous fur farming industry. This is also an opportunity for government to support farmers in transitioning to humane, healthy and sustainable alternatives, such as plant-based agriculture.

Please take the two actions below to support a fur farming ban at both the provincial and federal levels.

Sign the House of Commons e-petition calling on the federal government to introduce a Canada-wide ban on fur farming.

The federal e-petition is now closed. Stay tuned for updates!

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News/Blog

Support improved public access to plant-based foods

Vancouver “Local Food Action Plan” a chance to support better public access to plant-based food

The Vancouver Park Board is currently seeking public input through an online survey, closing January 28, on an updated “Local Food Action Plan”. The new 5-year plan will outline how the Park Board’s programming and services, which include community gardens; kitchens; food workshops; meal programs; farmers markets; concessions and restaurants, will contribute to a just and sustainable local food system.

This new plan comes at a crucial time, as society continues to deal with the COVID-19 public health pandemic and as concerns surrounding our food system continue to grow. COVID-19 has highlighted and exacerbated existing inequities within the food system. It has drawn attention to the dangerous and cruel nature of factory farms and the risks they pose as potential contributors to future pandemics; the exploitative conditions facing workers and animals on farms, in slaughterhouses and food processing plants; the connection between unsustainable, industrial food production and climate change; and the issue of food insecurity for historically underserved communities.

A growing body of research concludes that a significant shift in diets and food production toward fewer animal products and more plant-based foods is necessary. These changes are needed in order to meet our climate goals, tackle the biodiversity and factory farming crises, and to sustainably feed a growing population a healthy diet.

Food system experts are increasingly calling on all levels of government, including municipalities, to support these much-needed dietary and food system changes through food-related policies, practices and programming. The Park Board’s new Local Food Action Plan is a key opportunity for doing just that. Incorporating and prioritizing more plant-based foods, meals and education in Park Board services, such as meal programs, workshops, events and at concessions and restaurants, will help to support much-needed dietary and food system change. It will also improve public access to healthy, humane and sustainable food options.

If you’re a Vancouver resident, please consider participating in the Local Food Action Plan survey before the January 28th deadline. You’re welcome to use the recommendations we’ve listed below to guide responses about opportunities for the Park Board moving forward, but please be sure to fill out the survey in your own words and based on your own experiences.

VHS Recommendations: 
  • Animal welfare & a “just and sustainable food system” – A truly “just and sustainable local food system” will incorporate not only the protection of people, the planet and public health, but also our social responsibility for the protection of animal welfare. Therefore, a shift toward improving public access to healthy, humane, sustainable and equitable plant-based foods and diets must be reflected in the new Local Food Action Plan. 
  • The role of municipalities – Food system experts are calling on governments, including municipalities, to take action to support dietary and food system change that prioritizes a shift to plant-based in their plans and policies. 
  • Improving plant-based access & education – The Local Food Action plan is an opportunity to improve public access to plant-based foods and diets, as well as plant-based education, through Park Board services such as meal programs, fieldhouse workshops, events, farmers markets, concessions and restaurants.   
  • Expanding resources to under-served communities – The Local Food Action Plan should assess and address gaps in programs and services for under-served communities. This is another area where plant-based food access and education can also be enhanced.  
  • Emergency planning & preparedness – COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of ensuring food security programming is maintained during emergency situations and is adaptable so as to ensure communities are able to continue accessing resources.  
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News/Blog

Plant-based businesses in Vancouver & area: Your ethical shopping & eating guide

Animal-free shopping and eating guide

Do you want to make sure no animals were harmed when you’re shopping or eating? Struggling to find the perfect gift for someone? Looking to support and order from a local restaurant? This list of plant-based businesses in Vancouver & the Lower Mainland has you covered.

Click on a section in the table of contents to be directed to a list of relevant plant-based businesses in Vancouver and the surrounding area (with a few clothing retailers from elsewhere in Canada.)

Interactive map

Restaurants that are 100% plant-based

Business nameIn restaurant eating?Order online?Description
Aleph Eatery1889 Powell Street,
Vancouver, BC
YMiddle Eastern
Bad Apple2481 E Hastings St, Vancouver, BCYHealthy “pub” food, punk theme
BeetBox Veg1074 Davie St, Vancouver, BCYComfort food
Buddha-full106 West 1st Street, North Vancouver,  BC (one other location)YFresh whole food-based meals
Chau Veggie Express2 locations:
Victoria Drive
Granville Island
YModern Vietnamese
Chickpea4298 Main Street, Vancouver, BCYMiddle Eastern
Chi Vegan1935 West 4th Ave, Vancouver, BCYModern Vietnamese
CHOMP Vegan Eatery2234 E Hastings, Vancouver, BCYOrganic gluten-free pub fare
Copper Branch280 Nelson St, Vancouver, BCYPub fare
Indigo Age Cafe436 Richards St, Vancouver, BCYRaw vegan food; dessert menu section
Kind Cafe3080 Main St, Vancouver, BCNRestaurant with baked goods, zero waste
Khoe1370A E Georgia St., Vancouver, BCYModern Vietnamese
KokomoMultiple locations:
Chinatown
Kitsilano
North Vancouver
YFresh whole food bowls
Komo Comfort FoodsNYPlant-based food delivery
Kula KitchenNYPlant-based BBQ
Lotus Seed Vegan736 W Broadway, Vancouver, BCYPlant-based dishes from different cultures
MeeTMultiple locations:
Gastown
Yaletown
Main Street
YPub fare with dishes from other cultures
MILA Plant-Based185 Keefer St, Vancouver, BCYFlavour focused, internationally inspired, premium casual dining
Mizu Sushi Co.383 Raymur Avenue, Vancouver, BCYGluten-free sushi
Pizzeria Grano3240 Main Street, Vancouver, BCYPizza
Planetary Burger3088 Main St, Vancouver, BCYBurgers, fries, and milkshakes
Plant Me.245 East Broadway, Vancouver, BCYHealthy casual fare
The Cider House1602 Yew St, Vancouver, BCYCider and fresh foods (ask if cider is vegan)
The Green MoustacheMultiple locationsY (Whistler)Cafe with meals, smoothies, desserts
The Pizza Castle and Indian Curry1110 Commercial Dr, Vancouver, BCYPizza and Indian food
Veg Out Plant-Based Burgers & ShakesFood truckNBurgers, fries, and milkshakes
Vegan Cave415 Abbott St,
Vancouver, BC
NPizza
Vegan Pizza House2119 Kingsway, Vancouver, BCYPizza
Virtuous PieMultiple locations:
Chinatown
UBC
YPizza and ice cream
Wurst of Us1889 Powell Street
Vancouver, BC
YHot dogs and nachos

Dessert businesses that are 100% plant-based

Business nameIn store?Online shopping?Description
Bonus Bakery1185 W Georgia St, Vancouver, BCYDrinks & pastries
Dough & CoNYBakery delivery
Edible Flours2280 W Broadway, Vancouver, BCYCupcakes, cookies, breads, loaves and other bakery goods
Fairy Cakes3586 Fraser St, Vancouver, BCNBaked goods & popsicles; peanut/nut-free
Flourgirl BakingNYCinnamon and other sweet buns
GLOW ChocolateMultiple locationsYChocolates and truffles
Hooray TrufflesNYChocolates and truffles
Level V Bakery39 Kingsway, Vancouver, BCYCakes & pastries
Living LotusNYChocolate products
Livvy’s Bakery CookiesMultiple LocationsY – through SPUDCookies
Naked DoughNYCookie dough
Panela Lemon1507 Powell St #150, Vancouver, BCYCookies
PikanikNYGluten-free, allergy-free artisan breads, cakes, desserts, etc
Saviour FoodsNYCookie dough
Say Hello Sweets620 Quebec St, Vancouver, BCYIce cream
Sweets From the EarthNYCakes, cookies, muffins, bars & squares
To Live ForMultiple locationsYBaked goods
Two Daughters Bakeshop980 W 1st St #105, North Vancouver, BCYVegan & gluten-free pastries, breads & other treats
Umaluma Dairy-Free Gelato235 E Pender St, Vancouver, BCYIce cream – some flavours contain honey
Vegan Pudding & Co101 – 422 Richards St, Vancouver, BCYWindow counter selling cakes, pudding and tea
Vogue CakesNYCakes & other desserts
Yellow Basket BakingNYOrganic, nut-free bakery operating at pop-ups & farmer markets
Zimt Chocolate Cafe1336 Clark Dr, Vancouver, BCYOrganic treats, hot drinks and chocolates

Food and beverage businesses that are 100% plant-based

Business nameIn store?Online shopping?Description
Blue Heron Cheese Shop2410 Main St, Vancouver, BCNGourmet cheeses
BlumeNYBeverage blends
Boochy BarMultiple locationsYKombucha and popsicles
Eternal Abundance Eatery & Grocery1025 Commercial Dr, Vancouver, BCYGrocery products and cafe
Ergogenics NutritionMultiple locationsYSports supplements
Glory Juice Co.Multiple locationsYFresh juices, nut mylks, and cleanses
gomae mealsNYmeal prep
Harken Coffee338 Powell St, Vancouver, BCYCafé with meals & desserts
Healthy Choice Wholesale FoodsNNBulk foods
Kindred CulturesMultiple locationsYKefir live probiotics
Lita’s Mexican FoodsMultiple locationsNPrepared Mexican foods
Manna Sacred MealsNYMeal prep
PlantbaseNYMeat alternatives
Planted MealsNYMeal prep
Plant Life Nutrition2140 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver, BC
YVegan supplements
Plant CuriousNYVariety box
Plant VedaMultiple locationsYPlant-based dairy
Shani’SeasoningMultiple locationsYTofu scramble spice blend
Tality KombuchaMultiple locationsYKombucha
Tea SparrowNYTeas
The Modern MeatNYMeat alternatives
The Juice TruckMultiple locationsYJuice
TMRW FoodsMultiple locationsNMeat alternatives
Whisk Matcha CafeNYMatcha
Wild Trails Coffee134 East 14th Street, North Vancouver, BCNWraps, paninis, baked goods and coffee
Yoggu Coconut YogurtMultiple locationsYYogurt
Vegan Supply250 E Pender St, Vancouver, BCYGrocery store and online retailer

Plant-based clothing, bedding, footwear and products

Business nameIn store?Online shopping?Description
Bed2932 Main Street, Vancouver, BCY100% cotton bedding
BellantoniMultiple retailersYSustainable vegan clothing
ComfyComfyNYBuckwheat hull pillows
Daub and DesignNYSustainable vegan clothing
Dream Designs2749 Main Street,
Vancouver, BC
YNatural bedding, some contain wool
FairechildNYRecycled vegan rain protection for adults and kids
Frank and Oak316 West Cordova St, Vancouver, BCYSustainable outerwear, some products contain wool
Friend & FauxNYVegan clothing
Grinning GoatNYAnimal-free clothing, shoes, accessories and beauty products
Haven Sleep CoNYA variety of vegan mattresses and bedding
inBed Organics1683 Chestnut St, Vancouver, BCYA variety of vegan mattresses and bedding
Inner Fire ActivewearNYSustainable vegan yoga pants and clothing
Kuseno Comfort ProductsMultiple retailersYBuckwheat hull pillow and hot/cold packs
Mala the BrandNYCandles made using soy, cotton, wood and glass
Native ShoesMultiple retailersYAll vegan footwear
Nice Shoes3568 Fraser Street, Vancouver, BCYAll vegan footwear
NoizeMultiple retailersYAll vegan clothing and outwear
Peace People ProjectNYUpcycled vegan clothes
PlantactiveNYClothing with vegan messages
Save the DuckMultiple retailersYVegan clothing and outerwear
Vegan YarnNYYarn made of cotton, bamboo, linen, and Tencel (Eucalyptus trees)
Vessi FootwearNYAll vegan footwear
Wuxly MovementToronto, ONYCanadian-made vegan outwear

Plant-based beauty and cleaning products and services

Business nameIn store?Online shopping?Description
Aspen CleanMultiple retailersYEco-friendly cleaning service with specially developed plant-based products
Blue DotNYSingle ingredient of ionized water that can disinfect fruits and vegetables
Botanical TherapeuticNYHair and skin care products
CeremonieNYNatural skincare products
Clarity ApothecaryNYNatural oils
Eventide Botanic AlchemyNYFace masks
Honest Cleaning & ServicesNYCleaning service with vegan products
IliaYYSkincare powered makeup
Lippy Girl MakeupMultiple retailersYMake-up
LisseNYShaving products and soaps
Live for TomorrowMultiple retailersYCleaning products
Nala CareMultiple retailersYDeoderant
Nellie’s All-NaturalMultiple retailersYZero-waste cleaning products, laundry detergent
Okoko CosmetiquesYYBotanical oils and extracts
Peregrine Supply CoMultiple retailersYBeard and grooming products
Pink House OrganicsMultiple retailersYBath, body, skin, and makeup
RiversolYYSpecialty skincare
SapadillaYYCleaning products
Sappho: New ParadigmYYOrganic, vegan makeup
ScentualsYYHand sanitizer, bath and shower, body, face and aromatherapy
Skwalwen BotanicalsYYWild harvested plants for face and body products
Tru EarthYYZero waste laundry detergent
United and FreeNYGender-neutral hair, skin, and bath care products
Vintage Touch CleaningNYHouse cleaning services
Vitale Body & Soul CareYYSkincare products
Wild Jasmine Natural ApothecaryMultiple retailersYHandcrafted bath and body care products with an eco-conscious focus
Willow’s Wax Bar2139 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BCNCruelty-free wax and other beauty products
WoodlotMultiple retailersYVegan and eco-friendly skin care

Plant-based pet products

Business nameIn store?Online shopping?Description
v-planetNYPlant-based dog food
VecadoMultiple retailersYPlant-based pet food and treats
Virchew Dog FoodNYPlant-based dog food
24/7 Dog WalksVegan dog-walking service (vegan treats, leashes, etc.) Contact info: 24.7dogwalks@gmail.com, 604-837-4553.

Do you know of more plant-based businesses in Vancouver or the Lower Mainland? If you have any additions or modifications to this listing, please email info@vancouverhumanesociety.bc.ca.

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